December 9, 2019

‘BKMs’ To Implement Intel® vPro™ Technology Quicker, Easier

first_imgA while back, I was talking with Dave McCray, a buddy in Intel’s IT group, about a training room that he’d just finished equipping with Intel® vProTM Technology-based PCs. As the vPro PR guy, I’m always looking for stories that might interest the media and thought Dave’s hands-on experience might yield some angles. Dave has been working with vPro since its early days, and as we chatted about the installation, it became apparent that he’d developed an extensive toolbox of BKMs (Intelese for “best known method methods”) that make it quicker and easier to fire up vPro. We came up with the idea for a series of how-to videos as a way to share his honed procedures. To do that, we recruited another friend, Brett Twiggs, a systems engineer with LANDesk, an Avocent company, whose LANDesk* Management Suite incorporates vPro’s capabilities in its user-friendly approach. The result is a four-part series of chats and hands-on demos that make the implementation and use of vPro that much easier, plus some sage advice gleaned from Brett’s and Dave’s experience. They start with some Shop Talk, and then discuss Green IT, Enhancing Security, and finally Remote Diagnostics and Repair. Hope these are helpful. And if you have some tips, let us know.last_img read more

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December 9, 2019

Saturated fileserver? Cache data locally.

first_imgServing large amount of powerful compute servers, many of our file servers are struggling from the high load and from time to time may become a bottleneck.    One of the most common access patterns in our batch environment is related to validation, where some dataset under test is accessed again and again by thousands of batch jobs. Such dataset never changes after it gets created, and after some period of time it becomes irrelevant, as new version of the same dataset gets released and all tests are pointed to this new version.    To accommodate such workloads, we’ve developed caching mechanism which is highly integrated with the actual testing environment. Every time the test lands on a compute server, it validates if the relevant dataset is already cached. If it is, the test runs against the cached copy on local disk. If it’s not, the test copies the dataset to the local disk either from file server or from one of the peer compute servers, and registers such new location in the central directory service. This solution results in significant reduction of load on the central file servers. The cache manager also takes care of the old data clean up.Do you have issues with file servers performance? How do you solve them?Till the next post,   Gregory Touretskylast_img read more

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December 9, 2019

Two Days in the Cloud…with Curry

first_imgThere isn’t a hotter place for technology now than Asia Pacific. Rate of adoption of new technologies is at a fever pitch, and if you consider population present in this region, an uptick of 10% of the market represents adding the population of the US to the connected world. And while the whole region is growing, the unique thing about APAC is that it consists of established markets (i.e. Korea, Australia & New Zealand), relatively established growth markets (i.e. India), and go-go emerging markets (i.e. Malaysia, Vietnam) representing unique challenges for market advancement.All of this growth represents major business opportunities for new cloud computing services, placing an urgency on building the data center infrastructure to keep pace with emerging requirements. Within this context, Intel delivered two days of deep training on cloud computing in Penang this week to the leading data center managers from throughout the region as well as leading regional press. We brought along our friends from the Cloud Builders program to highlight the latest in Reference Architectures and talked a bit about the Open Data Center Alliance’s vision for the cloud. In all, it was one of the most engaged crowds I’ve been around in a long time, and learning flowed to both ends of the conversation as customers shared their unique challenges and we shared the latest innovations in cloud.Over the next few days I’ll be providing some specific thoughts on trends and opportunities observed from the event…in the meantime, let me know if you’ve got any specific input or questions on how the cloud looks to play out in Asia.last_img read more

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December 9, 2019

Innovative partnerships make education relevant to the next generation

first_imgIntel recently unveiled two reference designs aimed at the education marketOpens in a new window: a clamshell notebook and a tablet, each outfitted with intriguing peripherals and software for educators. Intel will not be selling these products directly, and is looking to its network of partners for these solutions to be delivered to classrooms. Partnerships matter when these solutions have to educate children of the next generationOpens in a new window from birth through their growing years. Especially innovative partnerships as outlined by IntelOpens in a new window at HP DiscoverOpens in a new window. Effective partnerships are all about complementing products and services with a common objective to make the solutions relevant to the next generation of innovatorsOpens in a new window.For example, HP helped the government of United Arab Emirates change the lives of children through enhanced education and innovation. The Smart Learning programOpens in a new window is designed to help shape the future of education by deploying 190,000 student tablets to 123 primary schools acrossthe region. The benefits of this infrastructure include personalization of each student’s data, easy assessments of overall class performance, and parental supervision of their child’s progress. Education can be constrained, however, by the availability of essential resources, such as power, in different parts of the world. Take for example, East Africa, where there is little-to-no access to normal power sourcesOpens in a new window. To circumvent this, HP implemented solutions that did not require massive power sources, introducing solar power, batteries, and a small ProLiant ML server. Aided by 40 virtual machines, a small 48-port switch and 40 Ethernet cables, the infrastructure required no more than 2.5 kW of power, serving as the launch pad for educating the future workforce.When it comes to the next generation, Intel CEO Brian KrzanichOpens in a new window takes us back all the way to the newborn baby at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show.Opens in a new window When a Mimo TurtleOpens in a new window is attached to a peacefully sleeping newborn in a Mimo onesieOpens in a new window, coffee cups a few feet away light up with colorful indicators that represent the baby’s motion, breathing, pulse rate, temperature, and etc. Krzanich was delivering the keynoteOpens in a new window while emphasizing the need for partners, such as REST DevicesOpens in a new window, to build solutions with the latest Intel processor, code-named Edison.The New Style of IT opens up opportunities to innovate solutions today for application in real lifeOpens in a new window. But innovation is not a short-term project. Innovation must be sustained in the blood stream of the enterprise; looking forward to the future. So it’s not just about the next generation of innovation, but also laying the path for the next generation of innovatorsOpens in a new window.Towards the end of his keynote, Krzanich brought to the stage bright young minds of tomorrow who have already shown their innovating capability today – including a sprightly 13-year-old.Partnerships like those between HP and Intel are vital to innovate on a sustained basis at key intersections, like those at the crossroads of academia and industryOpens in a new window.How about you? What are other steps you would suggest to continuously groom the next generation of innovators? Please let me know. E.G. Nadhan is an HP Distinguished Technologist with over 25 years of experience in the IT industry delivering solutions in distributed environments.Team up with him on HP.comOpens in a new windowFind him on LinkedInOpens in a new windowFollow him on TwitterOpens in a new window (@NadhanAtHP)Keep up with him on FacebookOpens in a new windowVisit his Journey BlogOpens in a new windowCheck out his previous posts and discussionslast_img read more

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December 9, 2019

Extending Open Source SDN and NFV to the Enterprise

first_imgBy Christian Buerger, Technologist, SDN/NFV Marketing, IntelThis week I am attending the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen, China, to promote Intel’s software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) software solutions. During this year’s IDF, Intel has made several announcements and our CEO Brian Krzanich has showcased Intel’s innovation leadership across a wide range of technologies with our local partners in China. On the heel of Krzanich’s announcements, Intel Software & Services Group Senior VP Doug Fisher extended Krzanich’s message to stress the importance of open source collaboration to drive industry innovation and transformation, citing OpenStack and Hadoop as prime examples.I participated at the signing event and press briefing for a ground-breaking announcement between Intel and Huawei’s enterprise division to jointly define a next-generation Network as a Service (NaaS) SDN software solution. Under the umbrella of Intel’s Open Network Platform (ONP) server reference platform, Intel and Huawei intend to jointly develop a SDN reference architecture stack. This stack is based on integrating Intel architecture optimized open source ingredients from projects such as Cloud OS/OpenStack, OpenDaylight (ODL), Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK), and Open Virtual Switch (OVS) with virtual network appliances such as a virtual services router and virtual firewall. We are also deepening existing collaboration initiatives in various open source projects such as ODL (on Service Function Chaining and performance testing), OVS (SRIOV-based performance enhancements), and DPDK.In addition to the broad range of open source SDN/NFV collaboration areas this agreement promotes, what makes it so exciting to me personally is the focus on the enterprise sector. Specifically, together with Huawei we are planning to develop reference solutions that target specific enterprise vertical markets such as education, financial services, and government. Together, we are extending our investments into SDN and NFV open source projects to not only accelerate advanced NaaS solutions for early adopters in the telco and cloud service provider space, but also to create broad opportunities to drive massive SDN adoption in the enterprise in 2015. As Swift Liu, President of Huawei’s Switch and Enterprise Communication Products, succinctly put it, Intel and Huawei “are marching from software-hardware collaboration to the entirely new software-defined era in the enterprise.” © 2015, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.last_img read more

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December 9, 2019

The True Cost of Data Breaches

first_img True Cost of Data BreachesOpens in a new window from Matthew RosenquistOpens in a new window The presentation slides are available on Slideshare.net  Interested in more?  Follow me on Twitter (@Matt_Rosenquist) and LinkedIn to hear insights and what is going on in cybersecurity. It is a Data Breach World!  2015 was a banner year for the loss of sensitive records.  Over 700 million records were exposed, with government and healthcare organizations representing the biggest victims.  Wrapping our minds around the loss and subsequent costs is beyond difficult.  With 80 thousand records lost every hour, a stream of never ending headlines, executives stepping down, and a steady increase in the grumblings of consumer opinions, how can we quantify the risk picture?  Some models exist, attempting to pin a cost-per-record by averaging widely varying extremes across an ever changing spectrum of damages, but the results are often less than comprehensive or accurate when applied in a predictive nature.  The question of costs and impacts are becoming ever more needed by executives who are trying to manage the risks.  What are the factors?When an organization suffers a data breach, a number of challenges, cascading effects, and business decisions contribute to the total of all the associated costs.  The scope extends beyond a fixed dollar-per-stolen-record calculation, as it invariably includes expenditures for new security measures, legal fees, third-party forensic services, changes to business processes, as well as a loss of reputation and customer goodwill.  There is a complex set of chain reactions which occur after every significant data breach, each adding its own contribution to the overall cost and business impact.I had the pleasure of speaking to the topic at the 2016 iSMG Fraud and Data Breach Summit in San Francisco.  I briefly covered the range of impacts, popular cost models, detailed the different cost aspects, provided recommendations, and even touched on where the attackers will be taking data breaches in the future.  Ultimately, we must conclude the actual costs of Data Breaches is more complex than the common perception.  A better understanding of the costs and risks-of-loss, provide valuable insights to organizations seeking to determine their desired path and achieve their optimal level of security.last_img read more

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December 9, 2019

Safe and sound—digital security with home desktop PCs

first_imgIn today’s digital world, consumers face a barrage of online phishing attacks, new forms of nasty malware, and the risk of virus-infected desktops like never before. Unfortunately, cyber criminals do not discriminate, and it’s very easy to fall victim to their scams.But what if you could rest easy at night knowing all of your pictures, videos, and personal files are securely stored on a high-capacity, always-available desktop PC that stays safely in your home? [i]​,[ii] Here are a few ways that Intel Security is making this possible.Built-In Protection for Stronger SecurityAt its core, Intel-based desktops build security in from the silicon up to help safeguard your files, online transactions, data, and identity on a device that can reside securely in your home. Desktop PCs that are running 6th gen Intel Core processors feature hardware-based technologies that protect against a wide range of malware attacks and exploits—and help keep your system and data free from hacking, viruses, and prying eyes.As an added layer of support, the hardware-based security capabilities of Intel Identity Protection Technology can be found on more than 500 million PCs[iii] to support trusted device authentication. Now you can enjoy amazing computing experiences and more control over your personal content and information without worrying about the next Trojan horse.Say Goodbye to PasswordsCreating one strong password that you can remember is hard enough, but doing it for every single online account is almost impossible—until now. Many people use the same password everywhere, so it doesn’t take a skilled hacker to break into an account, just a good guesser.“More than 90 percent of passwords today are weak, predictable, and ultimately crackable,” says Dave Singh, product marketer, Intel Client Computing Group. “What we’re trying to do is help consumers develop good security habits when they’re browsing and shopping online, and password managers make this very convenient by decreasing frustration to provide a better user experience on their PCs.”As one example, True Key comes preloaded on most Intel-based desktop PCs with McAfee LiveSafe software. Users can sync their data across Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS devices and import passwords from all browsers and competitors. Advanced multi-factor authentication (MFA) and biometric security make it easy to sign into any account. Choose at least two different factors (e.g., trusted device, face, email, master password, numeric pin, or fingerprint) and the app will verify your identity. For additional security, you can add more factors and make your profile even stronger. Basically, True Key can recognize you and sign you in—eliminating the need for passwords altogether.“With so many different ways to log in and get to your personal content and information, password managers can really help increase productivity by saving time and headaches,” adds Singh.Seamless Online ShoppingImagine being able to walk up to your PC and have one central app manage your mobile wallet, healthcare account, or hotel membership profile. You can now book travel, buy and ship gifts or upload photos to the cloud more conveniently and better protected against malware.Some password managers can also store wallet items—credit cards, addresses, memberships—and make it easy to “tap and pay” at checkout for secure online payments and transactions. Intel technologies feature fast, end-to-end data encryption to keep your information safe without slowing you down, with built-in hardware authentication to provide seamless protection for online transactions.“Your high-capacity, always-available desktop can stay safely at your home with all your locally stored files, but you can securely access the information from other devices, including your smartphone,” Singh says.“Paired with new Windows 10 sign-in options like Windows Hello, desktop computing is truly becoming more personal and secure. It really shows how digital security is advancing to work better together for the best home computing experience.”So the next time you log into your home desktop PC, you can do it with a smile. Download the Flash Card for more tips on how to safeguard your digital security.[i] Intel technologies’ features and benefits depend on system configuration and may require enabled hardware, software or service activation. Performance varies depending on system configuration. No computer system can be absolutely secure. Check with your system manufacturer or retailer or learn more at intel.com.[ii] Requires an Intel® Ready Mode Technology-enabled system or motherboard, a genuine Intel® processor, Windows* 7, Windows 8.1, or Windows 10 OS. Results dependent upon hardware, applications installed, Internet connectivity, setup and configuration.[iii] True Key™ by Intel Security. Security White Paper 1.0. https://b.tkassets.com/shared/TrueKey-SecurityWhitePaper-v1.0-EN.pdflast_img read more

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December 3, 2019

CDC Looking Nationwide for More Swine Flu

first_imgThe U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today that it has not found any new cases of swine flu in the country other than the eight identified earlier. As of yesterday evening, Mexico reported it had 1004 suspected cases and 68 deaths (20 of which had been confirmed).At a press conference this afternoon, CDC officials emphasized that questions far outnumbered answers and that the situation remained fluid. “These are very dynamic times, and many things will be changing,” said Anne Schuchat, interim deputy director for science and public health. CDC is coordinating a nationwide effort by state and local public health departments to find new cases, she said.  “Now that we’re looking more widely, I expect us to find more throughout the country.” CDC now also has a team in Mexico assisting health officials there.At the moment, CDC has one of the few labs that can test for the new virus and has confirmed all the U.S. cases, as well as seven samples from Mexico. But the World Health Organization today posted the DNA sequence of the virus, as well as information for diagnostic laboratories. CDC says it has developed an improved polymerase chain reaction assay to detect the virus and will soon send it out to a network of 140 laboratories that work with the agency. “If there’s any appearance that things are not available to people, it’s mainly because it’s a new virus. We are making the reagents for it, and it’s just a matter of time for us to get them out,” said Daniel Jernigan, a medical epidemiologist in the influenza division. Jernigan says CDC anticipates that those reagents will be available “very soon.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Meanwhile, New York City is looking into possible swine flu cases, and the WHO has decided not to raise its pandemic threat level, although it did call the situation a “public health emergency of international concern.”last_img read more

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December 3, 2019

Two Shots for Kids, One for Preggers: U.S. Clarifies Swine Flu Vaccine Doses, Addresses Vaccine Safety Fears

first_imgU.S. policymakers erred on the side of caution in September when they recommended that children under 10 need two doses of the swine flu vaccine to develop a strong enough immune response to protect them from the disease. Now there’s strong evidence that they made the right call. New data also show for the first time that pregnant women need only a single shot.At a press conference today, Anthony Fauci, head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), revealed the new data about these two groups, which are at high risk of developing severe disease from the novel H1N1 virus. As he explained, the trials tested the inactivated vaccine made in 389 children under 10 and in 50 pregnant women. NIAID on 21 September reported preliminary data from the children’s study, which analyzed immune responses 8 to 10 days after participants received the vaccine and suggested the younger age brackets would need two doses. The new data confirm the preliminary findings. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Only 55% of those between the ages of 3 and 9 years of age had a “robust” immune response to the vaccine 21 days after a single dose. That dropped to 25% in children 6 months to 35 months of age. “However, there was a sharp increase in the immune response to the vaccine after they received a second dose,” said Fauci. Specifically, 8 to 10 days after receiving a second dose, 100% of the youngest children had a robust response, and 94% of the older group met that criteria. The vaccine did not cause any serious side effects.The data conflict with recommendations from released last week from the World Health Organization, which said that it’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization reviewed data and concluded that children could get by with a single dose during these times of limited vaccine supply. “We’re trying very hard to base our decision on the scientific data,” said Fauci. “We would like to get children as fully protected as we possibly can.”Clinical trials in 50 pregnant women in their second and third trimesters administered 15 micrograms to half the group and 30 micrograms to the other. The lower dose triggered what was deemed a protective antibody response in 23 of 25 women. Only one more woman reached that threshold in the group given the higher dose, so NIAID concluded that the lower dose is sufficient. Again, no serious side effects surfaced.Fauci explained to ScienceInsider that the trial excluded women in the first trimester of pregnancy because that population has the highest miscarriage rate, and investigating the cause of each loss potentially could put the study on hold repeated. “The trial would never finish,” said Fauci. He stressed that no data have linked the vaccine to miscarriage.As a reflection of the intense concern that many people have about taking the H1N1 vaccine or giving it to their children, the National Vaccine Program Office, a division of the Department of Health and Human Services, released a report today about its plans to monitor the pandemic vaccine’s safety. Bruce Gellin, vaccine office director, also said at the press conference that his office has convened an independent, special working group of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee to evaluate the safety data. Gellin said the group is having its first face-to-face meeting today, and plans to review the data biweekly. Each month, the committee will issue a report to the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, which holds meetings that are open to the public.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today says that manufacturers have supplied the government with a total of 30 million doses of the H1N1 vaccine, but as of 28 October, only 16.8 million of those had been ordered by states and shipped to them.last_img read more

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December 3, 2019

International Fusion Effort Finally Gets Go-Ahead, and a New Leader

first_imgAs expected, the governing council of the ITER fusion effort today finally approved the project’s so-called Baseline, the document outlining its design, schedule, and costs and confirmed Japanese fusion-scientist Osamu Motojima as the new director-general of the ambitious effort to harness the same energy source that powers stars. Although ITER’s future site in Cadarache, France, has been cleared for some time, full-fledged construction has been delayed as fusion scientists wrestled with last-minute design changes and the project’s seven international partners—China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States—tried to figure out how to deal with the soaring costs of building the facility. In particular, the European Union, which is responsible for 45% of ITER’s costs, struggled to find enough money in its existing budgets as its member countries resisted pleas for additional funds. Despite the approval of today’s Baseline, ITER members declined to make public an overall cost estimate for the project and calculating one is difficult as much of the construction will consist of in-kind contributions from various countries; some estimates, however, have suggested ITER will cost over €16 billion by the time it is built and achieves “first plasma,” which is now scheduled for November 2019.last_img read more

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December 3, 2019

New Law Gives Venezuelan Government Control Over Most Research Spending

first_imgA new science law in Venezuela says that research will now be done for the people and in part by the people, and no longer to benefit those “in white coats.” However, scientists fear the changes could hinder progress across many fields. The new rules, approved last week by the National Assembly to take effect on 1 January, would establish government control over a large pool of tax money previously spent by companies on internal research projects, or via collaborations with universities. Venezuelan scientists have weathered tough years under socialist president Hugo Chávez. (Science, 29 May 2009, p. 1126). But the surprise move by the assembly “might very well mean the end of science in the country” charges Jaime Requena, a biologist who was stripped of his position at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Caracas last year following a dispute with the government. 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Almost all professors began to develop new projects,” she said. Under the new law, however, the money from the tax will now be under direct control of the government. “Before it was companies who decided how to spend the money, now it is the government,” says García. “That is the crucial change.” She sees the future of Venezuelan science as “totally dark.” Ricardo Menéndez, the country’s science minister, said the change was necessary because 95% of funds since 2007 had been spent by companies on internal projects that were “disengaged from social realities.” He says “the law intends to stimulate a model of scientific research in the fundamental interest of the Venezuelan people, and not the specific needs of various private companies.” In rewriting the law, Venezuela set research priorities in four areas, including innovation in building materials, urban development, energy and climate change. The law takes some digs at the country’s scientific elites, viewed as hostile to the government. For instance, the Researcher Promotion funding program is being renamed Stimulus for Research because “the central goal of research isn’t its author [or] the person, but the concrete outcome,” Menéndez said. In addition, Menéndez said, funding will now be allocated based on “real results” and not scientific papers. The law opens research funding to the public, as well as to social and indigenous organizations. Menéndez praised one community project carried out in the state of Yaracuy that studied “how nutrition influences the growth of children” by measuring children eating different diets. “The moment of useful science has arrived,” said the science minister. Scientists have managed to block previous proposed changes to the science law, but this time the assembly acted “without consultation with scientific and academic entities or experts” Requena says. He fears that all research will now have to pass through a “socialist filter.”last_img read more

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December 3, 2019

Marcia McNutt Bringing Her ‘Intellectual Energy’ to Science

first_img Courtesy of Marcia McNutt Rumors of Scripps begone—geophysicist Marcia McNutt, who stepped down as head of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in February, is returning to Washington, D.C., as the new editor-in-chief of Science. McNutt will take over the editorship on 1 June from Bruce Alberts, who announced his retirement last year. McNutt is no stranger to Science: She served on Science’s Senior Editorial Board, which helps set journal policy, from 2000 to 2009, an experience that she says will be helpful in her new job on several fronts. “It gave me a chance to know many of the editors and staff at Science, and to understand at a high level a lot of the decisions that the editor-in-chief is responsible for,” including the balance of content between news and research or between different disciplines. “We anguished at many meetings over the readability of articles, over things like how much should be in the supplemental material, over trying to promote papers from developing countries. I’m sure a lot of those decisions and issues have not gone away.” McNutt also notes the many new pressures facing science publishing—such as authors bypassing journals entirely and posting their work directly on the Internet, sometimes as a way to more directly engage the public and provide more immediate connections to readers and promotion of their findings. “While that’s certainly their prerogative, I believe there is a huge value-added that journals still provide,” she says. “I can say this as an author—[there’s] the value-added that peer reviewers have offered me, by helping to focus papers, finding places where I could have said things better, or had made errors.” And, with scientists being busier than ever, she says, journals provide a vital service by sifting through thousands of scientific papers to find the best of the best. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) But with the changing face of publishing in mind, McNutt says that one of her priorities will be to help forge more connections between authors and their community. The goal is “that journals become more than just a place where papers are parked, but rather becomes part of the rapid advancement of science.” Before she was appointed as director of USGS in 2009, McNutt was president and CEO of California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute for 12 years. Before that, she was a faculty member at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was director of the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s (WHOI) Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Science and Engineering. McNutt says she plans to spend about 3 weeks a month on-site at the Washington, D.C., headquarters of AAAS, the publisher of Science. “I think it’s a great choice for a number of reasons,” says Robert Gagosian, president and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington, D.C., and former director of WHOI. “Having someone like Marcia will really make a difference. She has this intellectual energy, she’s going to throw out lots of ideas,” Gagosian says. Her “energy and fortitude” will be especially useful when it comes to helping to articulate the importance of science and research to the future of the country—particularly important in these days of shrinking research budgets, he adds. Gagosian recalls McNutt’s tirelessness during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill; she headed up the Flow Rate Technical Group, whose estimates of the flow of oil from the spill ultimately helped determine BP’s liability. “She wanted to get federal and academic scientists together, and she came down to Baton Rouge for a day after working 16-hour days for like 23 straight days. She has that kind of tenacity to really push hard on what she believes in.” Marcia McNuttlast_img read more

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December 2, 2019

Fugitive Connecticut Fund Manager Charged in New U.S. Indictment

first_imgA Connecticut fund manager who fled the United States after being hit with criminal insider trading charges was indicted on Wednesday for engaging in a separate scheme to embezzle $54 million from the private equity firm for which he worked. Related Itemslast_img

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December 1, 2019

Coffin remains tell life story of ancient sun-worshiping priestess

first_imgOnce upon a time in the Bronze Age, a girl was born to a family of sun worshipers living in the Black Forest of what is today Germany. When she was young she became a priestess in the local sun cult, and soon attracted the eye of a tribal chief who lived far to the north. The girl’s family married her off, and she went to live with the chief in what is now Denmark. She often traveled back and forth between Denmark and her ancestral home and eventually gave birth to a child while she was away. Sometime before her 18th birthday, she and the child died. They were buried together in an oak coffin, the young woman wearing a bronze belt buckle in the shape of the sun.How do we know? A new study of the 3400-year-old girl’s chemical isotopes, along with more conventional archaeological evidence, tells us so. At least, these are the conclusions of scientists who recently analyzed the teeth, fingernails, hair, and clothes of the Egtved Girl, so named for the Danish village where archaeologists first discovered her in 1921.The study is “state-of-the-art,” says Joachim Burger, an archaeologist at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany, who was not involved in the research. Alex Bentley, an archaeologist at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, calls the work “impressive and meticulous.” The study is highly unusual, researchers say, in the way that it brings together chemical tracers from a number of tissue types to reconstruct the life history of a single individual.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To study the Egtved Girl’s comings and goings, researchers led by Karin Frei, a geologist at the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, analyzed the different forms, or isotopes, of the element strontium in her tissues. Strontium occurs naturally in soil and rocks and usually enters the body in water we drink. The ratio of two of its isotopes—strontium-87 and strontium-86—varies depending on soil and geology and can be used to make informed guesses about where people or animals originally came from. Researchers usually look at teeth, which absorb the element when an individual is very young and whose strontium ratios do not change after about 3 or 4 years of age.In the case of the Egtved Girl, the team had not only her teeth, but also her hair, fingernails, clothes, and the ox hide on which her body was resting in the coffin, as well as the teeth and cremated bones of the child buried with her in a small box made of tree bark. (The girl’s uncremated bones did not survive the waterlogged, acidic environment in which the coffin was found.)To figure out where the girl came from, the researchers first analyzed strontium in one of her molars and found a ratio noticeably higher than that typically found in Denmark; a small, dense bone from the rear of the child’s skull that had survived cremation produced a similar ratio. The team concluded that both the girl and her child had spent their earliest years outside of Denmark, likely in the Black Forest area. This fits earlier archaeological evidence—from Bronze Age settlements, burial mounds, and the exchange of artifacts such as swords—that the peoples of Denmark and Germany had formed alliances between chiefdoms that probably involved intermarriage.To trace the Egtved Girl’s movements during the last period of her life, the team analyzed the strontium in her hair, which was 23 centimeters long, about shoulder length; because human scalp hair grows about 1 centimeter each month, that represented the last 23 months of her life. The researchers cut the hair into four segments and looked at the strontium ratios in each one. The oldest segment corresponded again to the Black Forest region, while the middle two segments were typical of Denmark. But the last segment, corresponding to the final 4 to 6 months of her life, once again reflected a sojourn in a distant place, possibly the Black Forest again. A similar pattern was seen in her fingernail—cut into three segments for analysis, representing in all her last 6 months alive—which confirmed that she had been away from Denmark shortly before she died. The wool fibers from her clothes, as well as the ox hide on which she was laid, also revealed strontium ratios from outside Denmark.Taken together, the evidence suggests that the girl, her child, and her clothes all originated from the Black Forest region, and that she married into a Danish chiefdom and was buried in Denmark after she died, the team reports today in Scientific Reports. The researchers concede that the identification of the Black Forest as her birthplace is speculative, but they are certain that it must have been several hundred kilometers away from where she was buried. Moreover, Frei says, the girl’s clothes were typical of the local culture in Denmark, even though the animals they were made from lived elsewhere. “I think that she tried to integrate herself into the local society by having a local-looking outfit, but made of raw material that came from far away and most likely from her place of origin.”Umberto Albarella, an archaeologist at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, says that the degree to which the young lady moved around over a relatively short period is “staggering,” even if her Black Forest origins are “speculative.” The study is also consistent with other evidence from genetics and linguistics that women moved around during the Bronze Age while men stayed put, Bentley says.last_img read more

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December 1, 2019

Your call and text records are far more revealing than you think

first_imgMetadata. It’s an obscure data science term that was unknown to most people until 2013, when they learned that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) is harvesting vast amounts of it from telephone calls. Government officials have downplayed the sensitivity of such data, but a crowdsourced study of phone metadata now finds that highly revealing information can be gleaned from a simple list of who called whom.NSA’s intrusion into citizen’s private lives may have roiled academics, but it has remained unclear what the spy agency was learning from phone metadata. A White House spokesperson reassured the public in 2013 that the metadata harvesting “does not allow the government to listen in on anyone’s telephone calls,” leaving privacy intact. Ever since then, a trio of computer scientists from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California—Jonathan Mayer, Patrick Mutchler, and John Mitchell—has been harvesting phone metadata themselves to see what can be revealed.Unlike NSA, the researchers collected their data with consent from people who downloaded an app called MetaPhone. Once installed on a smart phone, it collects the phone numbers and timing of every call and text message made and received. More than 800 people downloaded the app and consented. If their privacy really is protected, then the records of their 1.2 million text messages and 250,000 calls should reveal little.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) In fact, the metadata revealed quite a lot. By using public information and cheap commercial databases to map phone numbers to businesses, organizations, and social media profiles, metadata revealed the location and identity of most of the people, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Even deeply private details such as chronic health problems, religious affiliations, and drug use emerged by simply linking people to various clinics, stores, and organizations through their call records. The sensitivity of phone metadata is “common knowledge in the security and privacy communities,” Mutchler says. The goal of the study was to “put hard data behind these hunches.” The more important revelation, he says, is the shape of a graph that charts phone call networks. In an attempt to limit the scope of phone metadata surveillance, NSA is purportedly following a “two-hop” rule: For any given person of interest, metadata can only be harvested from people called by that person, and then also people called by them. But the study found that a large proportion of their subjects were connected to each other not through personal relationships but through customer service lines, telemarketers, and two-factor authentication services such as those used by Google. Even with a two-hop limitation, an NSA analyst could in principle “hop” to an additional 25,000 people from any one individual. “The existing literature on telephone graph structure hadn’t really mentioned these hubs,” Mutchler says. “Their presence makes some of the legal limitations on the NSA’s access to metadata totally ineffective,” assuming the goal of the two-hop limit is to reduce unnecessary intrusion into people’s private lives.”The study has important implications for surveillance law and policy,” says Arvind Narayanan, a computer scientist and data privacy expert at Princeton University. “Our intuition for terms such as ‘two hops,’ [and how it limits the number of people connected to you], proves wildly inaccurate when applied to modern telephone networks.” And he notes that NSA has vastly more data and resources than academic researchers. “With access to millions of records and sophisticated machine learning techniques, it is likely that one can obtain a far more complete picture of individuals’ sensitive personal details, behavior, and more.”last_img read more

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December 1, 2019

Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdown

first_img Where have all the insects gone?Entomologists call it the windshield phenomenon: Car windshields used to be covered in the spring and summer months with the remains of insects. That’s not the case in many places today. Observations about splattered bugs don’t count as scientific, so now researchers are turning to more than 30 years of data collected by a dedicated group of mostly amateur entomologists across western Europe. And what they’ve found supports the anecdotes: dramatic drops—up to 80%—in insect populations across dozens of sites.Descartes’s brain had a bulging frontal cortexSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Scientists have long wondered whether the brains of geniuses could hold clues about their owners’ outsized intelligences. Modern scientists are trying to figure out what made René Descartes’s mind tick by creating a 3D image of his brain by scanning the impression it left on the inside of his skull. One part that stood out: an unusual bulge in the frontal cortex, in an area that previous studies have suggested may process the meaning of words.This mysterious human species lived alongside our ancestorsWhen paleoanthropologist Lee Berger was digging up the cave-enshrined remains of a mysterious new species of hominin named Homo naledi in 2013, two spelunkers pulled him aside. They had found what looked like an ancient thigh bone in a completely different cave. Now, the thigh bone, a skull, and other fossils—collected as an afterthought—are putting a startling date on H. naledi’s existence: 236,000 to 335,000 years ago. That would mean a creature similar to ancient human ancestors lived at the same time modern humans were emerging in Africa and Neandertals were evolving in Europe.Botanists fear research slowdown after priceless specimens destroyed at Australian borderThis week’s news that Australian customs officers incinerated irreplaceable plant specimens has shocked botanists around the world, and left many concerned about possible impacts on international research exchanges. Some have put a freeze on sending samples to Australia until they are assured that their packages won’t meet a similar fate, and others are discussing broader ways of assuring safe passage of priceless specimens.Smuggled dino eggs gave birth to ‘baby dragons’In the early 1990s, scientists discovered an unusual cache: a set of large, thick-shelled fossil eggs topped by a single dinosaur embryo, previously entombed in rocks smuggled out of the Henan province of China. After the fossils were recovered and ultimately returned, scientists carefully analyzed the embryo—nicknamed “Baby Louie”—and determined that the 90-million-year-old remains represent a new species of giant oviraptorosaur, which they’ve dubbed Beibeilong sinensis, meaning “baby dragon from China.” (Left to right): Zhao Chuang; PAUL VAN HOOF/MINDEN PICTURES; Wits University/John Hawks Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdowncenter_img By Ryan CrossMay. 12, 2017 , 3:45 PMlast_img read more

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December 1, 2019

Top stories: Earth’s oldest life, a NASA mission to Titan, and whether growing up poor makes you wiser

first_img By Roni DenglerDec. 22, 2017 , 12:20 PM (Left to right): Nicolas Hoizey/Unsplash; Graeme Churchard/Flickr/CC-BY 2.0; iStock.com/Jevtic The lower your social class, the ‘wiser’ you are, suggests new studySociety as a whole might be getting smarter, but we still don’t get along. Perhaps that’s because wisdom—the ability to take the perspectives of others into account and aim for compromise—reduces conflict, not intelligence. Now, a new study suggests such wisdom comes more naturally to those who grow up poor or working class.NASA picks missions to Titan and a comet as finalists for billion-dollar missionSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)NASA selected the final candidates for its next billion-dollar robotic spacecraft Wednesday. The contenders would send a semiautonomous quad-copter to Saturn’s largest moon Titan or a spacecraft to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on the next New Frontiers mission. The finalists have until January 2019 to refine their pitches to the agency, with a launch planned by 2025.Bugs may be causing a common mold to produce a deadly toxinThe potentially fatal poison known as aflatoxin can stunt children’s growth and cause liver cancer. The toxin is produced by a common mold, Aspergillus flavus, that grows on crops. But only some of these molds produce the toxin. Now, researchers have shown that insects spur A. flavus to make aflatoxin, suggesting ways to keep it out of the world’s food supply.Was trading by nomads crucial to the rise of cities?Pastoralists have long been seen as likely architects of the long-distance trade networks that helped spur the rise of the world’s first civilization. But now, archaeologists are building a different picture, one that means nomads weren’t the natural conduits for trade. Instead, they assert herders mainly stuck close to and served the needs of specific urban areas, rather than migrating between far-flung cities.Life may have originated on Earth 4 billion years ago, study of controversial fossils suggestsFor 25 years, researchers have debated whether 3.5-billion-year-old microscopic squiggles encased in Australian rocks are evidence for the earliest life on Earth. Now, a comprehensive analysis of the microfossils suggests that these formations do indeed represent ancient microbes; ones potentially so complex that life on our planet must have originated some 500 million years earlier.center_img Top stories: Earth’s oldest life, a NASA mission to Titan, and whether growing up poor makes you wiserlast_img read more

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